Call Us Today: 202-787-1944


Form I-212 - Application for Permission to Reapply for Admission into the United States After Deportation or Removal 


Form I-212 Summary
Purpose An alien who is inadmissible under section 212(a)(9)(A) or (C) of the Immigration and Nationality Act (INA) files Form I-212 to obtain "consent to reapply for admission" that is required before the alien can lawfully return to the United States. "Consent to reapply" is also called "permission to reapply." INA section 212(a)(9)(A) makes individuals who seek admission to the United States after having been removed from the United States, inadmissible. They are inadmissible for the period specified in INA section 212(a)(9)(A), depending on the basis of the prior removal and on how many times they have been removed. Departure while a removal order is in effect also makes someone inadmissible under INA section 212(a)(9)(A). INA section 212(a)(9)(C) makes individuals who return or attempt to return to the United States without admission inadmissible if they: were removed from the United States, or had been unlawfully present in the United States for more than a year, in the aggregate.
Size 3 Pages + Instructions 13.
Edition Date 12/16/12. (06/05/12; 09/11/11 and 11/23/10 edition also accepted)
Where to FileThe filing of this application depends on the reason for your inadmissibility and your location. Every applicant should consult the Form I-212 Instructions ("Where to File?" pp 4-6 and Appendix I, pp 12-14) to determine the proper filing location. The application is either filed with the U.S. Customs and Border Protection (CBP), the U.S. Department of State (DOS), the Executive Office for Immigration Review (EOIR), or USCIS.

  • If you are seeking admission as a nonimmigrant at a U.S. port of entry and you are not required to obtain a nonimmigrant visa, you should file Form I-212 with CBP. Filing this application is generally done in person at a CBP-designated port of entry or a CBP-designated preclearance office. There are exceptions to the in-person filing. It is recommended that you contact the CBP preclearance office or the CBP port of entry where you intend to be processed before submitting your application. To find a CBP-designated port of entry or CBP-designated preclearance office and to obtain information on required documentation and processing procedures, visit the CBP Web site.

Citizens of Palau, the Federated States of Micronesia, or the Marshall Islands may contact the nearest consulate of the U.S. Department of State to receive instructions on where and how to submit this form. 

  • If you are seeking admission as an immigrant or if you are seeking adjustment of status: Consult the Form I-212 Instructions ("Where to File?" section, pp 4-6) and Appendix I (pp 12-14) to determine the filing location. 
  • If you are an applicant in removal proceedings: You should file Form I-212 according to the instructions provided to you in immigration court. For information about EOIR, visit EOIR's web site.
  • If you are abroad, and intend to apply for an immigrant visa, submit this form to the Local Office in which your deportation proceedings were held. If you are  applying for a waiver of grounds of excludability at the same time, file this application with the American Consul with whom you are filing your application for waiver.
  • If you are abroad and intend to apply for a nonimmigrant visa or border crossing card, submit this application to the American Consul with whom you submit your visa or crossing card application, if instructed to do so by the Consul.
  • If you are in the United States and will file an application for waiver under Section 212 (g), (h), or (i) of the INA with an American consul, file this application and the waiver application with the American Consul.
  • If you are in the United States and are applying for adjustment of status under Section 245 of the INA, or are seeking advance permission to reapply prior to your departure from the U.S., submit the application to the Local Office having jurisdiction over the place where you reside.

E-Notification: If you want to receive an e-mail and/or a text message that your Form I-212 has been accepted at a USCIS Lockbox facility, complete Form G-1145, E-Notification of Application/Petition Acceptance and clip it to the first page of your application.  Form G-1145 can be downloaded through the link below.

See Special Instructions below for additional guidance.

Filing Fee $585.No biometrics fee is required
Special Instructions If you are inadmissible only under INA section 212(a)(9)(A), you should file this form if you are: 
  • An applicant for an immigrant visa; 
  • An applicant for adjustment of status under INA section 245 (other than as a T or U nonimmigrant seeking adjustment of status under 8 CFR 245.23 or 245.24); or 
  • An applicant who wishes to seek admission as a nonimmigrant at a U.S. port of entry but who is not required to obtain a nonimmigrant visa. (If you are an applicant for a nonimmigrant visa at a U.S. consulate, and you are required to obtain consent to reapply because of your inadmissibility, the consulate with jurisdiction over your visa application will advise you how to request consent to reapply. You may not be required to file the Form I-212 to receive consent to reapply.)

If you are inadmissible under INA section 212(a)(9)(C), you should file this form if you are: 

  • An applicant for an immigrant visa; or 
  • An applicant who wishes to seek admission as a nonimmigrant at a U.S. port of entry but who is not required to obtain a nonimmigrant visa. (If you are an applicant for a nonimmigrant visa at a U.S. consulate, and you are required to obtain consent to reapply because of your inadmissibility, the consulate with jurisdiction over your visa application will advise you how to request consent to reapply. You may not be required to file the Form I-212 to receive consent to reapply.)

If you are inadmissible under INA section 212(a)(9)(C), you may NOT file  this Form while you are in the United States. You cannot obtain consent to reapply unless you are seeking admission to the United States more than 10 years after your last departure from the United States.

Note: A VAWA self-petitioner who is inadmissible under INA section 212(9)(C) may seek a waiver of inadmissibility by filing a Form I-601, Application for Waiver of Grounds of Inadmissibility, under INA section 212(a)(9)(C)(iii). The Form I-601 may be filed instead of this Form I-212.  See the filing instructions for Form I-601 for further information. 

When applying with CBP: You must make your check or money order payable to U.S. Customs and Border Protection. The check or money order must be drawn on a bank or other financial institution located in the United States and must be payable in U.S. currency. Certain CBP-designated ports of entry or certain CBP-designated preclearance offices may accept payment in the form of cash or credit cards. It is recommended that you contact the CBP preclearance office or CBP port of entry where you intend to be processed for payment instructions. Please visit the CBP Web site (Link in the Related Links Section of this Page) for more information. Citizens of Palau, the Federated States of Micronesia, or the Marshall Islands may receive payment instructions by contacting the nearest U.S. Embassy or consulate, or by e-mailing the CBP/Admissibility Review Office at inquiry.waiver.aro@dhs.gov.

When applying with DOS: You must contact the nearest U.S. Embassy or consulate of the DOS on the method of payment.

When applying with EOIR during removal proceedings: You must submit the payment as instructed by the court with jurisdiction over your case. For more information, please visit EOIR's Web Site.

When applying with USCIS: Please see the page "Paying Immigration Fees" in the Related Links section of this page for more information on how to pay your filing fees with USCIS.

Do not send Change of Address Requests to the USCIS Lockbox facilities.

 
  Download Form I-212 only
 
  Download Form I-212 Instructions only
 
  Download Form G-1145, E-Notification of Application/Petition Acceptance



Need More HELP!

Get Personalized Legal Advice from a VisaPro Attorney
Browse Tips and Procedures about Specific Visas
Discover More about VisaPro Legal Services



Immigration Forms Library
US Citizenship Forms
US Department of Labor Forms
Department of State Forms
American Green Card Lottery Forms
Federal Court Forms
US Information Agency Forms
Immigration Court Forms
USCIS Forms (INS Forms)
US Passport Forms
Prevailing Wage Rates Forms
Social Security Forms

U.S. Immigration Attorney - Consult Now!

IMMIGRATION CENTER
Immigration Services
  Fast, Easy and Economical Avoid Costly Immigration Errors!
Immigration Guide
 Know Your U.S. Immigration Options
Immigration Law FAQ
 Detailed Answers to Your Immigration Questions
Immigration Articles
 Interesting and Useful Articles on a Variety of Relevant Topics

How can we help you?
MESSAGE BOARDS
How do I fill out Form I-212?
When do I start Green Card?
Discuss US Immigration
NEWSLETTER - FREE!
Receive latest immigration updates and free legal tips by e-mail. Sign up now!
IMMIGRATION DICTIONARY
Legal terms explained in plain English!

On this topic I-212
RELATED VISAS
Deportation
Exclusion Proceedings
Waiver of Excludability
RELATED ARTICLES
Filing H1B Cap 2016 Petitions:How To Get A Head Start With VisaPro’s H1B Visa 2016 Timeline
H1B Cap Exempt Employers: How Do You Find Out If You Qualify?
H-1B Cap Has Reached:How Do You Hire H-1B Cap Exempt Candidates?
2016 H1B Cap Petitions:How To Properly File With USCIS
H1B Cap Exempt – Are You Eligible?
5 Common H1B Cap 2016 Filing Mistakes - How to Avoid Them
H1B Cap 2016 Filing Secrets: Why You Should Plan Now?
P-1 Visa for eSport Professionals: Let the USCIS Game Begin!
H-1B vs L-1: Which One is Best?
E-3 Extension of Status in the U.S.: Three Essential Things to Keep in Mind
More Articles...