Naturalization

Frequently Asked Questions & Answers

16. Can I reapply for Naturalization if the USCIS denies my application?

Yes, in many cases, you may reapply. If you reapply, you will need to complete and resubmit a new Form N-400, Application for Naturalization, and pay the fee again. You will also need to have your fingerprints and photographs taken again. If your application is denied, the denial letter should indicate the date you may reapply for Citizenship. If you are denied because you failed the English or Civics test, you may reapply for Naturalization as soon as you want. You should reapply whenever you believe you have learned enough English or Civics to pass the test.


17. What should I do if I have lost my Certificate of Naturalization?

You may get a new Certificate of Naturalization by submitting Form N-565, Application for Replacement Naturalization/Citizenship Document, to the USCIS if you have lost your Certificate of Naturalization. It may take up to one year for you to receive a new certificate.

OR
Check My Eligibility

18. What should I use as proof of Citizenship if I have lost my Certificate of Naturalization?

If you have one, you may use your passport as evidence of Citizenship while you wait for a replacement certificate.


19. If I am a U.S. citizen, what is the process to naturalize my child?

A child who is born in the U.S., or born abroad to U.S. citizen(s) who lived in (or came to) the U.S. for a period of time prior to the child’s birth, is considered a U.S. citizen at birth.

This is applicable to a child who is:

  1. Born to a U.S. citizen who did not live in (or come to) the U.S. for a period of time prior to the child’s birth, or
  2. Born to one U.S. citizen parent and one alien parent or two alien parents who naturalize after the child’s birth, or

3. Adopted and is permanently residing in the U.S. This child can become a U.S. citizen by action of law on the date on which all of the following requirements have been met:

a.The child was lawfully admitted for permanent residence

b.Either parent was a U.S. citizen by birth or Naturalization

c.The child was still under 18 years of age

d.The child was not married

e.The child was the parent’s legitimate child or was legitimated by the parent before the child’s 16th birthday (Stepchildren or children born out of wedlock who were not legitimated before their 16th birthday do not derive U.S. Citizenship through their parents.)

f.If adopted, the child met the requirements of section 101(b)(1)(E) or (F) and has had a full and final adoption

g.The child was residing in the U.S. in the legal custody of the U.S. citizen parent (this includes joint custody)

h.The child was residing in the U.S. in the physical custody of the U.S. citizen parent


20. If I am a U.S. citizen, but my child does not meet the requirements listed above, can I still apply for Citizenship for my child?

  1. A child who is regularly residing in the U.S. can become a U.S. citizen only by meeting the requirements listed in Question 20 above
  2. If a child regularly resides in the U.S. and is not a legal permanent resident, the child cannot acquire Citizenship automatically until the child is granted legal permanent residence
  3. If a child who has been lawfully admitted for permanent residence fails to qualify for Citizenship under the provisions of law, the child may apply for Naturalization by filing Form N-400 after reaching 18 years of age, provided that the child has the required five years of legal permanent residence